Hard Water Makes Cleaning Harder

A study conducted for the Water Quality Research Foundation looked at the impact of water hardness on automatic dishwashers. Soft water was found to be 12 times more effective at cleaning dishes than increasing the amount of detergent used. Researchers also found that the most important factor in removing stains from clothing was water softness. Reducing water hardness was up to 100 times more effective at stain removal than increasing the detergent amount or washing with hotter water. 

Hard Water Costs You Money

According to The U.S. Geological Survey nearly 90 percent of American homes have hard water - water containing high levels of calcium and magnesium. Hard water makes it difficult to wash clothes and dishes and leaves scaling on your pipes and showerheads as well as ugly brown rings in your sinks and toilets. It's also costing you money. 

The Battelle Institute found that with hard water, showerheads lost 75 percent of their flow rate in less than 18 simulated months and could not maintain the required flow rate because of scaling. 

Managing Water in a Disaster

RainSoft water treatment delivers safe, clean water right to your tap, but in the event of a disaster you may not have access to your RainSoft treated water. To help manage water use during a disaster follow these tips from Ready.gov.

How Much Water to Store to Prepare for Disaster

RainSoft water treatment provides safe, clean water right to your tap, but in the event of a disaster you may not have access to RainSoft treated water.Ready.gov has recommendations on how much water you should store in case of a disaster. 

Store at least one gallon of water per person per day. A normally active person needs at least one gallon of water daily just for drinking however individual needs vary, depending on age, physical condition, activity, diet and climate.